3 iPhone Photography Tips for Taking Firework Photos

Posted by Glen Brown on

Fireworks are truly a wonderful spectacle to behold—so much so that many people document them in photos and videos. You may be guilty of this yourself, often reaching for your iPhone and whenever you see a display. 

However, most iPhone casual photographers don't succeed because of the learning curve they failed to account for. They even end up with bad or blurry photos and give up on taking pictures of fireworks.

The good news is that you can learn iPhone photography tricks to avoid a blurry “fireworks” picture disaster. While it might be a particularly challenging subject, the pictures are absolutely rewarding. Here are some surefire tips to bring your iPhone A-game when taking the perfect firework pictures.

1. Using a Tripod + A Perfect Spot 

Your iPhone needs all the tools and opportunities to be on par with the best. You will need to have a steady tripod and a perfect spot to have an excellent vantage point for firework photo-taking. Tripods will make sure that your pictures aren’t ruined by shaking hands or the cover of a thumb (yes, you’ve been there). You will also need to pick a spot that is further back. This angle is perfect for capturing the full explosive effect of any fireworks display. 

Bonus Tip: The perfect spot at your scenic backyard will definitely give you the prime location you need for taking the best pictures! 

2. iPhone Camera Don'ts: Avoid Using Flash and Zoom 

You may have set your iPhone to capture selfies or pictures of your dog. Some of the features used for these photos may have required flash or zoom. However, fireworks are not the ideal subject for zoom and flash photography. Zoom only pixelates the pictures further, and you will not be able to see the whole display. Flash, on the other hand, is a big no-no because it’s pointless when your subject is far away.  

Another bonus tip: HDR or High Dynamic Range is another iPhone feature that you will not find useful for fireworks because they falter in terms of capturing movement. 

3. iPhone Camera Do’s: Burst Mode & Exposure/Focus Lock

Fireworks displays are usually held during the late afternoon or nighttime, which means you’ll run into the common challenges of taking pictures with your iPhone in the dark. Fireworks need that “perfect moment” feel. They need to be taken right at the exact moment when they are at their best. You can easily miss a premium shot with your iPhone when you are not aware of the different features your camera has to optimize for quality shots. 

Burst Mode is the most used and reliable feature to have to capture fireworks. The “burst” of a firework gradually deteriorates once it explodes in the sky. Angle your iPhone camera to your firework subject and click burst mode to take shots in varying intensities. You will surely get the firework shot you wanted, especially when all the fireworks come alive in the sky all at once! 

Have ever seen a yellow box that appears with the labels “AE/AF lock” on your iPhone camera app? This useful feature is called Exposure/Focus Lock. You will find this particularly handy for fireworks because it allows you to lock the exposure or control the lightness-to-darkness ratio. You can use this feature with a well-timed and positioned angle when you know where the fireworks are going to go off.

Conclusion 

Your iPhone has untapped potential when it comes to taking the ideal fireworks shot. Just remember these tips are tricks. Remember, practice makes perfect!

One thing to keep in mind, however, is that you won’t be able to take great photos if you don’t have high-quality fireworks in the first place. Make sure you only purchase your fireworks from a reputable source so that you give yourself the best chances of success.

We are Lets Party Fireworks, one of the largest stocks of fireworks the UK has to offer. We have high-quality, mail-order fireworks and even fireworks for sale that are ready to be brought home.


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